Archive for June, 2014

Leadership, Monday 6/16/14: Barack Obama and Mitt Romney – Whatever side you’re on, see another side.

51QIs3W9taL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-v3-big,TopRight,0,-55_SX278_SY278_PIkin4,BottomRight,1,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_Following his bid to win the U.S. presidency, most Americans believed they knew Mitt Romney. With unprecedented access, the documentary we will watch in class today tracks Romney from 2006 and his first effort to win the Republican nomination, through the 2012 elections, revealing the man behind the sound bites in an authentic view the public rarely glimpsed during the media frenzy of a national campaign.

We will also watch a lyrical, unsentimental, and compelling memoir, Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance. The son of a black African father and a white American mother searches for a workable meaning to his life as a black American. It begins in New York, where Barack Obama learns that his father—a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man—has been killed in a car accident. This sudden death inspires an emotional odyssey—first to a small town in Kansas, from which he retraces the migration of his mother’s family to Hawaii, and then to Kenya, where he meets the African side of his family, confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life, and at last reconciles his divided inheritance.

Willard Mitt Romney (born March 12, 1947) is an American businessman who was the Republican Party’s nominee for President of the United States in the 2012 election. Before his presidential bid, he served as the 70th Governor of Massachusetts from 2003 to 2007.

Raised in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, by his parents George and Lenore Romney, Mitt Romney spent two and a half years in France as a Mormon missionary starting in 1966. In 1969 he married Ann Davies, with whom he has had five sons. By 1971, Romney had participated in the political campaigns of both of his parents. In that year, he earned a Bachelor of Arts at Brigham Young and in 1975, a joint Juris Doctor and Master of Business Administration at Harvard. Romney then entered the management consulting industry and in 1977 secured a position at Bain & Company. Later serving as its chief executive officer, he helped lead the company out of financial crisis. In 1984, he cofounded and led the spin-off company Bain Capital, a highly profitable private equity investment firm that became one of the largest of its kind in the nation. Active in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Romney served during his business career as the bishop of his ward (head of his local congregation) and then stake president in his home area near Boston. After stepping down from Bain Capital and his local leadership role in the church, he ran as the Republican candidate in the 1994 Massachusetts election for U.S. Senate. Upon losing to longtime incumbent Ted Kennedy, he resumed his position at Bain Capital. Years later, a successful stint as president and CEO of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee for the 2002 Winter Olympics led to a relaunch of his political career.

Elected Governor of Massachusetts in 2002, Romney helped develop and enact into law the Massachusetts health care reform legislation, the first of its kind in the nation, which provided near-universal health insurance access through state-level subsidies and individual mandates to purchase insurance. He also presided over the elimination of a projected $1.2–1.5 billion deficit through a combination of spending cuts, increased fees, and the closure of corporate tax loopholes. Romney did not seek re-election in 2006, instead focusing on his campaign for the Republican nomination in the 2008 U.S. presidential election. He won several primaries and caucuses but lost to the eventual nominee, Senator John McCain. His considerable net worth, estimated in 2012 at $190–250 million, helped finance his political campaigns prior to 2012.

Romney won the 2012 Republican presidential nomination, becoming the first Mormon to be a major party presidential nominee. Romney was defeated by incumbent Democratic President Barack Obama in the November 2012 general election, losing by 332–206 electoral college votes. The popular vote margin was 51–47 percent in Obama’s favor.

41IMNwGE6GL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-v3-big,TopRight,0,-55_SX278_SY278_PIkin4,BottomRight,1,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_Below is a review of Believe in America: Mitt Romney’s Plan for Jobs and Economic Growth

Mitt Romney has referred to this book as the definitive expression of his economic plan in the Republican candidate debates, so I decided to do some due diligence by reading it.

There are 59 recommendations in all, most of which would involve reversing policies of the current Administration. The basic thrust is to slow the big government express and cut the private sector a little slack. Some highlights follow:

TAXES (cut corporate tax rate from 35% to 25%, preserve Bush tax cuts, overhaul tax system longer term); REGULATORY (repeal Obamacare and Dodd-Frank, force regulators to consider costs of complying with new regulations, require Congressional approval of major regulations); TRADE (negotiate more trade agreements, get tough with China); ENERGY (expedite development of untapped US oil and gas reserves, ban EPA regulation of carbon emissions); LABOR (reverse NLRB effort to favor union organization vs. impartially arbitrating labor/management disputes); HUMAN CAPITAL (rationalize federal training programs and block grant them to the states, encourage immigration of well educated people with valuable skills); FISCAL (cut spending and cap it at 20% of GDP, support a balanced budget amendment).

Most of these ideas seem sensible to me, but the difficulties involved are understated in many cases and there is little discussion of how to overcome predictable objections. For example:

#Repealing Obama would take more than an executive order that support should be given to states that wanted to opt out, including offering an alternative program (none is satisfactorily described in the book) that would work better.

#It is said the first step towards “getting the federal debt under control” will be “admitting we have a problem and refusing to allow any more irresponsible borrowing.” In, other words, “just say no.” Fine, but how would President Romney propose to get the members of Congress on board?

No president could hope to implement more than a fraction of such an agenda, so it might have been better to focus on what Romney regards as the four or five top issues and go into more detail.

The absence of an identified author results in off putting statements like “Mitt Romney says” this and “Mitt Romney proposes” that, which detract from the book’s impact.,,An account attributed to Romney would have worked better, even if most readers suspected it was ghost written.

In sum, “Believe in America” marks Romney as a competent manager versus an inspirational leader. Probably that is who he is, but it is not necessarily a recipe for electoral success.

President Obama was born in Honolulu, Hawaii on August 4th, 1961, to a father from Kenya and a mother from Kansas. Growing up, he was also raised by his grandfather, who served in Patton’s army, and his grandmother, who worked her way up from the secretarial pool to become vice president at a local bank.

After working his way through school with the help of scholarship money and student loans, President Obama moved to Chicago, where he worked as an organizer to help rebuild communities devastated by the closure of local steel plants.

He went on to Harvard Law School, where he was elected the first African-American president of the Harvard Law Review. After graduating, President Obama went on to lead one of the most successful voter registration drives in state history, and continued his legal work as a civil rights lawyer and a professor teaching constitutional law at the University of Chicago.

Barack Obama was first elected to the Illinois State Senate in 1996. During his time in Springfield, he passed the first major ethics reform in 25 years, cut taxes for working families, and expanded health care for children and their parents. Elected to the U.S. Senate in 2004, he reached across the aisle to pass the farthest-reaching lobbyist reform in a generation, lock up the world’s most dangerous weapons, and bring transparency to government by tracking federal spending online.

Barack Obama was sworn in as president on January 20th, 2009. He took office in the middle of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, at a time when our economy was losing 800,000 jobs a month. He acted immediately to get our economy back on track. Today, the private sector has added back more than 5 million jobs. There’s more work to do, but we’re on the right track.

In his first term, the President passed the landmark Affordable Care Act, helping to put quality health care within reach for more Americans. He ended the war in Iraq and is working to responsibly end the war in Afghanistan, passed historic Wall Street reform to make sure taxpayers never again have to bail out big banks, and cut taxes for every American worker—putting $3,600 back in the pockets of the typical family. He’s fought for equal rights and a woman’s right to make her own health decisions. And he’s made a college education more affordable for millions of students and their families.

The President believes an economy that’s built to last starts with a strong and growing middle class—that’s why he has a plan to create jobs and restore economic security to working families. He’s been driven by the basic values that make our country great: America prospers when we’re all in it together, when hard work pays off and responsibility is rewarded, and when everyone—from Main Street to Wall Street—does their fair share and plays by the same rules.

Creativity 101, Mondday 6/16/14: Motifs in the Classic Film Titanic

91rZp5zs8kL._SL1500_Today, we will watch another classic film, Titanic. As usual, pay attention to plot, characters, and literary devices. We will also examine and learn about a new literary term: motifs.

First, let’s take a look oat our sample piece of great literature. According to an amazon review:

When the theatrical release of James Cameron’s Titanic was delayed from July to December of 1997, media pundits speculated that Cameron’s $200-million disaster epic would cause the director’s downfall, signal the end of the blockbuster era, and sink Paramount Pictures as quickly as the ill-fated luxury liner had sunk on that fateful night of April 14, 1912. Titanic would surpass the $1-billion mark in global box-office receipts, win 11 Academy Awards including Best Picture and Director, launch the best-selling movie soundtrack of all time, and make a global superstar of Leonardo DiCaprio. A bona fide pop-cultural phenomenon, the film has all the ingredients of a blockbuster (romance, passion, luxury, grand scale, a snidely villain, and an epic, life-threatening crisis), but Cameron’s alchemy of these ingredients proved more popular than anyone could have predicted. His stroke of genius was to combine absolute authenticity with a pair of fictional lovers whose tragic fate would draw viewers into the heart-wrenching reality of the Titanic disaster. As starving artist Jack Dawson and soon-to-be-married socialite Rose DeWitt Bukater, DiCaprio and Kate Winslet won the hearts of viewers around the world, and their brief, but never forgotten, love affair provides the humanity that Cameron needed to turn Titanic into a moving emotional experience. Although some of the computer-generated visual effects look artificial, others–such as the climactic splitting of the ship’s sinking hull–are state-of-the-art marvels of cinematic ingenuity. It’s an event film and a monument to Cameron’s risk-taking audacity, blending the tragic irony of the Titanic disaster with just enough narrative invention to give the historical event its fullest and most timeless dramatic impact. –Jeff Shannon

_____

PLOT SUMMARY:

In 1996, treasure hunter Brock Lovett and his team are searching the wreck of RMS Titanic for a necklace with a rare diamond, the Heart of the Ocean. They recover a safe and find inside a drawing of a nude woman wearing only the necklace. The drawing is dated April 14, 1912, the day the Titanic hit the iceberg. An elderly woman calling herself Rose Dawson Calvert and claiming to be the person in the drawing visits Lovett aboard the research vessel Keldysh and tells of her experiences as a passenger on the Titanic.

It is 1912 in Southampton, and 17-year-old first-class passenger Rose DeWitt Bukater, her fiancé Caledon “Cal” Hockley, and her mother Ruth DeWitt Bukater are boarding the Titanic. Ruth emphasizes the importance of Rose’s engagement; the marriage will resolve the DeWitt Bukaters’ secret financial problems. Made distraught by the engagement, Rose considers committing suicide by jumping off the ship’s stern; Jack Dawson, a penniless artist, intervenes and convinces her not to jump. Discovered with Jack, Rose tells Cal she was looking over the edge and Jack saved her from falling. Cal is at first indifferent to Jack’s actions, but when Rose indicates that some recognition is due, Cal offers Jack a small amount of money. After Rose mocks Cal by asking if saving her life meant so little, he invites Jack to dine with them in first class the following night. Jack and Rose develop a tentative friendship, even though Cal and Ruth are wary of the young third-class passenger. Following the dinner, Rose secretly joins Jack at a party in third-class.

Cal and Ruth both disapprove of Rose seeing Jack, so Rose attempts to rebuff Jack’s continuing advances. However, she soon realizes that she prefers him to Cal, and goes to meet him during what turns out to be the Titanic’s last moments of daylight ever. They go to Rose’s stateroom, where she asks Jack to sketch her nude wearing only the Heart of the Ocean necklace, which was Cal’s engagement present to her. Afterward, they evade Cal’s bodyguard and make love in an automobile in the ship’s cargo hold. Later, the pair go to the ship’s forward deck, witness a collision with an iceberg, then overhear the ship’s officers and designer discussing its seriousness. Rose and Jack decide to warn her mother and Cal.

Cal discovers Jack’s sketch of Rose and a mocking note from Rose are in Cal’s safe along with the necklace. Furious, he arranges for his bodyguard to slip the necklace into Jack’s coat pocket. Accused of stealing it, Jack is arrested, taken to the Master-at-arms’ office, and handcuffed to a pipe. Cal puts the necklace in his own coat pocket. Rose evades both Cal and her mother, who has managed to board a lifeboat, then frees Jack. The crew starts to launch flares to attempt to obtain help from nearby ships.

Once Jack and Rose reach the top deck, Cal and Jack encourage Rose to board a lifeboat; Cal claims that he has arranged for himself and Jack to get off safely. After she boards, Cal tells Jack the arrangement is only for himself. As Rose’s boat lowers away, she realizes she cannot leave Jack and jumps back on board the Titanic to reunite with him. Infuriated, Cal takes a pistol and chases them into the flooding first-class dining saloon. After using up all his ammunition, Cal realizes, to his chagrin, that he gave his coat and the diamond to Rose. With the situation now extreme, he returns topside and boards a lifeboat by carrying a lost child in his arms.

Jack and Rose return to the top deck. All lifeboats have now departed and passengers are falling to their death as the stern rises out of the water. The ship breaks in half, and the stern rises 90 degrees into the air. As it sinks, Jack and Rose ride the stern into the ocean. Jack helps Rose onto a wooden panel only buoyant enough to support one person. Holding the edge of the panel, he assures her she will die an old woman, warm in her bed. Jack dies from hypothermia. Fifth Officer Harold Lowe has commandeered a lifeboat to search for survivors. Rose gets Lowe’s attention and is saved.

Rose and the other survivors are taken by the RMS Carpathia to New York, where Rose gives her name as Rose Dawson in memory of Jack. She hides from Cal on Carpathia’s deck as he searches for her. She learns later that he committed suicide after losing everything in the Wall Street Crash of 1929.

Back in the present, her story complete, Rose goes alone to the stern of Lovett’s salvage vessel, takes out the Heart of the Ocean, which has been in her possession all along, and drops it into the sea over the wreck site. When she is seemingly asleep in her bed, the photos on her dresser visually chronicle that she lived a life of freedom and adventure thanks to Jack. A young Rose is then seen reuniting with Jack at the Grand Staircase of the RMS Titanic, congratulated by those who actually perished on the ship.

_____

From a creative writing perspective. Theme, characterization, motifs, mood, and plot are concepts that apply to film as well as other forms literature.

• Filmmakers purposely create a desired effect. Film elements (angles, shots, sound, lighting, and transitions) are used to influence the audience’s perception and understanding.
Identifying specific elements of film can help us to be critical viewers.

A motif is any recurring element that has symbolic significance in a story. Through its repetition, a motif can help produce other narrative (or literary) aspects such as theme or mood.

_____

A narrative motif can be created through the use of imagery, structural components, language, and other narrative elements. The flute in Arthur Miller’s play Death of a Salesman is a recurrent sound motif that conveys rural and idyllic notions. Another example from modern American literature is the green light found in the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Narratives may include multiple motifs of varying types. In Shakespeare’s play Macbeth, he uses a variety of narrative elements to create many different motifs. Imagistic references to blood and water are continually repeated. The phrase “fair is foul, and foul is fair” is echoed at many points in the play, a combination that mixes the concepts of good and evil. The play also features the central motif of the washing of hands, one that combines both verbal images and the movement of the actors.

A motif establishes a pattern of ideas that may serve different conceptual purposes in different works. Kurt Vonnegut, for example, in his non-linear narratives such as Slaughterhouse-Five and Cat’s Cradle makes frequent use of motif to connect different moments that might seem otherwise separated by time and space. In the American science fiction cult classic Blade Runner, director Ridley Scott uses motifs to not only establish a dark and shadowy film noir atmosphere, but also to weave together the thematic complexities of the plot. Throughout the film, the recurring motif of ‘eyes’ is connected to a constantly changing flow of images, and sometimes violent manipulations, in order to call into question our ability, and the narrator’s own, to accurately perceive and understand reality.

We will look for and identify various motifs in Titanic.

Children from fourteen different families reflect kaleidoscopic diversity

families-susan-kuklin-hardcover-cover-artFamilies, by Susan Kuklin features frank, funny, touching, and often surprising interviews, children from fourteen different families talk about how they identify themselves as a family. The range of families profiled in this engaging book reflects the kaleidoscopic diversity of families in America today: there are mixed-race families and immigrant families; families of gay and lesbian couples and very religious families; families with only children, many children, adopted children, and children with special needs. This book is a celebration of all families, and provides young readers with windows into other lives, as well as mirrors in which they can see their own family relationships reflected.

School Library Journal said:

This book consists of interviews with the children from 15 different families, including mixed-race, immigrant, gay, lesbian, and divorced, as well as single parents and families for whom religion is a focal point. The children may be adopted, have special needs, be only children or have multiple siblings, and, of course, the characteristics frequently overlap. The interviews focus on the youngsters’ feelings about being part of their family: adults do not interfere. The voices are natural, and the children come across as individuals, not just representative of a particular lifestyle or ethnic group. According to an author’s note, Kuklin allowed her subjects to choose how they would be photographed, including the clothing worn and what family mementos would be shown. Working with those constraints, Kuklin has composed sharp and vibrant photos that capture the essence of each of them. This book will be both attractive to browsers and an excellent impetus for discussing relationships and diversity in America.

“Combining interviews and engaging color photos, Kuklin’s latest book shows the diversity of families in America,” according to Booklist. “Each of the 15 double-page spreads focuses on one family, illustrated by three photographs: a family portrait, a picture of the children, and a photo from the family’s own collection.”

The text consists of the children’s wide-ranging and occasionally disjointed comments about themselves, their siblings, their parents, and aspects of their lives such as religion, divorce, Down syndrome, and growing up in a biracial family. Readers may not want to pursue all this in one sitting, but each story is interesting. Eloise, adopted at a Chinese orphanage, wonders about her birth parents. Ella, who has two fathers, tells how her family dealt with “Moms Weekend” at her sleep-away camp. Joshua and his twin sisters, Ashley and Kati, talk about twinship, hobbies, and Korean elements in their daily lives. An attractive introduction to the ever-stretching definition of family.

Susan Kuklin is the award-winning author and photographer of more than thirty books for children and young adults that span social issues and culture. Her photographs have susan-kuklin-photo (1)appeared in Time, Newsweek, and the New York Times.

According to BookRags, “photojournalist Susan Kuklin follows her natural curiosity, her strong desire to promote social justice, and her fascination with people when embarking on each new project for children. She explains that her books take on a life of their own once the subjects get involved. “Sometimes the books seem to be writing themselves, taking me someplace extraordinary where I have never been before,” the New York City-based former schoolteacher told Authors and Artists for Young Adults (AAYA). Working as an author and illustrator of photo-essays for young children since the early-1980s–among her many books are Reaching for Dreams: A Ballet from Rehearsal to Opening Night, How My Family Lives in America, and Kodomo: Children of Japan, Kuklin has also written several topical nonfiction books for older teens that grapple with controversial subjects. These include the straight-talking Speaking Out: Teenagers Take on Race, Sex, and Identity, published in 1993.

Leadership, Wednesday 6/11/14: How Great Leaders Inspire Us

Click on Image to Read More About this Book

Click on Image to Read More About this Book

QUOTES from:  Simon Sinek, Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action

“There are only two ways to influence human behavior: you can manipulate it or you can inspire it.Very few people or companies can clearly articulate WHY they do WHAT they do. By WHY I mean your purpose, cause or belief – WHY does your company exist? WHY do you get out of bed every morning? And WHY should anyone care?

People don’t buy WHAT you do, they buy WHY you do it.

We are drawn to leaders and organizations that are good at communicating what they believe. Their ability to make us feel like we belong, to make us feel special, safe and not alone is part of what gives them the ability to inspire us.

For values or guiding principles to be truly effective they have to be verbs. It’s not “integrity,” it’s “always do the right thing.” It’s not “innovation,” it’s “look at the problem from a different angle.” Articulating our values as verbs gives us a clear idea – we have a clear idea of how to act in any situation.

Happy employees ensure happy customers. And happy customers ensure happy shareholders—in that order.

Leading is not the same as being the leader. Being the leader means you hold the highest rank, either by earning it, good fortune or navigating internal politics. Leading, however, means that others willingly follow you—not because they have to, not because they are paid to, but because they want to.

You don’t hire for skills, you hire for attitude. You can always teach skills.

Great companies don’t hire skilled people and motivate them, they hire already motivated people and inspire them. People are either motivated or they are not. Unless you give motivated people something to believe in, something bigger than their job to work toward, they will motivate themselves to find a new job and you’ll be stuck with whoever’s left.

Trust is maintained when values and beliefs are actively managed. If companies do not actively work to keep clarity, discipline and consistency in balance, then trust starts to break down.

All organizations start with WHY, but only the great ones keep their WHY clear year after year.”

Creativity 101, Wednesday 6/11/14: Learning from Great Artists – Pablo Picasso

An idea is a point of departure and no more. As soon as you elaborate it, it becomes transformed by thought. ” -Pablo Picasso

Click Here to Visit A Picasso Gallery for Kids.

Click on Image to Read More About This Book

Click on Image to Read More About This Book

Pablo Ruiz y Picasso, also known as Pablo Picasso (Spanish: [ˈpaβlo piˈkaso]; 25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973), was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. As one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture,[2][3] the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907), and Guernica (1937), a portrayal of the German bombing of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War.

Picasso, Henri Matisse and Marcel Duchamp are regarded as the three artists who most defined the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the 20th century, responsible for significant developments in painting, sculpture, printmaking and ceramics.

Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a realistic manner through his childhood and adolescence. During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas. His work is often categorised into periods. While the names of many of his later periods are debated, the most commonly accepted periods in his work are the Blue Period (1901–1904), the Rose Period (1904–1906), the African-influenced Period (1907–1909), Analytic Cubism (1909–1912), and Synthetic Cubism (1912–1919).

Exceptionally prolific throughout the course of his long life, Picasso achieved universal renown and immense fortune for his revolutionary artistic accomplishments, and became one of the best-known figures in 20th-century art.

In the book, Picasso, art critic and scholar Philippe Dagen approaches Picasso as a subject through a series of questions. What does it mean to be an artist in the twentieth century? What does it mean to be an artist in the time of newspapers and museums, in a time when the art market has expanded to reach the entire western world? Is modern civilization so different that it gives an artist a new attitude and causes him to redefine his role for the public, the market, and, therefore, to invent entirely new artistic practices?

Picasso is considered here in view of this last, and most probable, hypothesis. He is a product of his situation and time, in the broadest sense of the term. Refusing to confine himself to his studio or the small artistic community in Paris, Picasso responded forcefully to world affairs, giving pictoral and sculptural form to the passions and events he witnessed around him. This is a thoroughly modern Picasso, constantly and consciously confronting the modernity of the world.

Dagen’s original exploration of his techniques, materials, and images shows how the artist both allowed modernity to in?ltrate his work and at the same time to react against it. Picasso moved between acceptance and rejection, a perpetual confrontation that is, perhaps, the most satisfying explanation of his will to create change that drove him to leave the most varied and diverse body of work in the entire history of art.

 

EXCERPT from: Pablo Picasso Biography for Kids:

He and Georges Braque invented Cubism, a form of painting that featured simple geometric shapes. He is also known for making collages – gluing previously unrelated things together with images. He created oil paintings, sculpture, drawings, stage designs, tapestries, rugs, etchings, collage, and architecture. No other painter or sculptor was as famous while he was still alive. It is estimated that Picasso produced at least 50,000 works of art: 1,885 paintings; 1,228 sculptures; 2,880 ceramics, roughly 12,000 drawings, many thousands of prints, and numerous tapestries and rugs. He also wrote plays and poetry. He became very wealthy.

Some of his famous paintings include: The Old Guitarist; Asleep and Seated Woman, which portray Marie-Therese Walter, one of the women he loved; Guernica, a mural about the Spanish Civil War; and Three Musicians.

Picasso loved many women. He married two of them, Olga Khokhlova and Jacqueline Roque. He had four children: Paulo, Maya, Claude and Paloma, who is famous for her jewelry designs. He died April 8, 1973 in Mougins, France.

Art is not the application of a canon of beauty but what the instinct and the brain can conceive beyond any canon. When we love a woman we don’t start measuring her limbs. ” -Pablo Picasso

Leadership 101, Tuesday, June 10: Leadership and Self Esteem

Click on Image to read more about this book

Click on Image to read more about this book

A leader with high self esteem does not feel threatened by others ideas. A person with high self esteem will not have a problem with letting the subordinates be empowered and accomplish great things. High self esteem makes the leader want to see the best in others as they see in themselves the good in the world.

A leader with low self esteem will feel threatened by ideas and empowered employees. They will tend to try and control people. They are often afraid that if they do not control people that they will lose their leadership role. A better leader may emerge forth and that would be bad. That is why the leader with low self esteem will often try and hire people just a little below their ability. In that way, a low self esteem person will not feel threatened.

SOURCE: http://respectandleadership.net/selfesteemandleadership.html

RECOMMENDED READING: Navy SEAL LEADERSHIP Presents “Unbeatable”: Recreate Your Life As Extraordinary Using the Secrets of a Navy SEAL
Most people are intrigued by what SEALs do — like dangerous and secretive missions. But what they DO is only part of the equation. Who do SEALs have to BE to carry out these impossible missions? While Navy SEALs are effective commandos, they possess an attitude and a set of attributes (the 12 secrets) that EVERYONE can attain to utilize in their home and work lives. Through extensive research and study, Jack Schropp, a former Commander of the Navy SEALs, believes that SEALs are trained to possess SEAL Secrets to be elitist in their field. In Unbeatable you will have access to these secrets and the possibility of polishing them. Each chapter contains exercises that you can implement into your life. So, be sure to roll up your sleeves and to the emotional work of a Navy SEAL. This is not a book about war or military strategy. It is a book based on a peaceful leadership technology for both men and women.

And see: 12 Must Read Leadership Books for Young Adults, by Tim Elmore

SOURCE: http://growingleaders.com/blog/must-read-leadership-books-young-adults/

EXCERPT:
Leaders decep1. Leadership and Self-Deception, by the Arbinger Institute

This is often the first book I recommend to a student who’s begun their leadership journey. It’s a parable about a self-absorbed man who learns to get beyond himself.

2. The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen Covey

This classic by the late Stephen Covey covers seven key habits that successful people in any industry have chosen to embrace: priorities, decision making, goals, etc.

3. How to Win Friends and Influence People, by Dale Carnegie

Another classic written decades ago, the book covers timeless truths for engaging people and earning the right to be heard. Simple lessons in emotional intelligence.

Creativity 101, Tuesday 6/10/14: The Link Between Creativity and Self Esteem

Click on image to read more about this title

Click on image to read more about this title

Being creative involves an attitude of receptivity and self acceptance.

Whenever you give rise to a thought, almost straight after, an element of judgment sometimes comes in. ‘Good’ or ‘bad’, ‘right’ or ‘wrong’, ‘nice’ or ‘horrible’.

Sometimes this process is so quick you don’t even notice the space between the thought that comes up and the judgments that follow. You might not even be aware of the thoughts themselves.
SOURCE: http://www.doorway-to-self-esteem.com/self-esteem.html

RECOMMENDED READING: Making the Most of Today: Daily Readings for Young People on Self-Awareness, Creativity, and Self-Esteem

The first book of daily readings for all kids guides young people through a whole year of positive thinking and practical lifeskills.

Each reading addresses an issue important to adolescents and teens—making choices and making friends, laughter and learning, feelings and families. Inspiring quotations, brief essays, and affirmations encourage kids to think more deeply about themselves and their world; to take positive actions and make positive changes; and to grow in self-esteem and emotional health—the keys to making the most of every day.

What do creativity and self-esteem have to do with bullying prevention? A lot. Creativity and self-esteem are directly linked. They’re both essential for problem-solving. And bullying prevention is all about solving problems – from pre-school to the workplace.

Targets of bullying suffer from low self-esteem more frequently than bullies themselves. If you want to inoculate a child against bullying, boosting their self-esteem through creative expression may help. In her blog doorway-to-self-esteem.com, May Bleeker talks about some of the strengths creativity builds:

  • The ability to quiet your inner critic. This also builds self-esteem.
  • Self-acceptance. As Bleeker writes: “If you never let yourself emerge with any spontaneity, there can be no genuine acceptance of yourself.” Accepting yourself, even some of your quirkier or less capable parts, is a major step toward accepting and understanding others.
  • Perseverance in the face of “failure” or “mistakes.” In the creative process, things that look like “failures” can be the breakthroughs that lead to success. Creative people, and those with higher self-esteem, will work longer to solve a problem.

SOURCE: http://bullyingepidemic.com/creativity-self-esteem/

%d bloggers like this: